SCA TITLE
RUSSIAN EQUIVALENT
CYRILLIC SPELLING
APPROXIMATE PRONUNCIATION
NOTES


King
Tsar
Царь
tsahr

Queen
Tsaritsa
Царица
tsahr-eet-tsah
ruler in her own right or wife of the Tsar
Prince
Tsarevich
Царевич
tsahr-yeh-veech
children of the above
Princess
Tsarevna
Царевна
tsahr-yehv-nah
The above recommended for personas after c. 1550.
King
Velikii Knyaz
Великий Князь
Ve-lee-kee Knyahz

Queen
Velikaya Knyagynya
Великая Княгыня
Ve-lee-ka-ya knyah-gee-nyah
ruler in her own right or wife of the Velikii Knyaz
Prince
Knyazhich
Княжич
Knya-zhich
children of the above, Naslednik/Naslednitsa means "heir"
Princess
Knyazhna
Княжна
Knyazh-na
The above are recommended for personas before c. 1550.

Duke
Kniaz
Князь
knyahz
pronounced as one syllable
Duchess
Kniaginia
Княгиня
knyah-gee-nyah
with a hard 'g', not a 'j'
Count
Kniaz
Князь
knyahz
pronounced as one syllable
Countess
Kniaginia
Княгиня
knyah-gee-nyah
with a hard 'g', not a 'j'
Viscount
Kniaz
Князь
knyahz
pronounced as one syllable
Viscountess
Kniaginia
Княгиня
knyah-gee-nyah
with a hard 'g', not a 'j'
No changes above.

Knight
Rytsar
Рыцарь
ree-tsahr
the "ee" is pronounced in the back of the throat
Sir
(none)



According to Predslava Vydrina, this Old Russian term was used to designate Western European knights.
The native Russian noble cavalry were called druzhinniki. I'm not sure why this term was deemed inappropriate for the list.

Master
Master
Мастер
mah-ster

Mistress
Master
Мастер
mah-ster


Baron
Posadnik
Посадник
poh-sahd-neek
"governor of a city-state"
Voevoda
Воевода
voy-yeh-vohd-ah
Means "commander" or "governor"; military overtones
Baroness
Posadnitsa
Посадница
poh-sahd-nee-tsah
"governor of a city-state"
Voevoda
Воевода
voy-yeh-vohd-ah
Means "commander" or "governor"; military overtones
Voevoda in the meaning of governor is very late, or even OOP usage. In period chronicles, the term is almost exclusively used in the meaning of a military commander or general.

Posadnik would seem like a strange choice here, if one only studied Novgorod. There, the Posadnik is chosen by the local veche, not the prince. But this situation was unusual in the Rus' lands. Apparently, in most places in Rus, the posadnik was an appointed "namestnik" (deputy, lieutenant, representative) of the ruling prince, which perfectly matches SCA usage.

Lord
Pomestnik
Поместник
poh-myehst-neek

Lady
Pomestnitsa
Поместница
poh-myehst-nee-tsah
A pomestnik is a dvoryanin who has received non-hereditory land, pomeste, in return for service.

The pomestie system is late period - some sources say after about 1500, although I've found one, the BSE, that says it existed from the 14th cent. I have found one source that indicates that the term should be pomeshchik, not pomestnik. However, the term first appears in the Sudebnik of 1497 as "pomestnik": Судебник 1497 впервые называет "поместника, за которым земли великого князя"… [Big Soviet Encyclopedia] The term does not appear at all in the Novgorod Chronicle.

I have found the term "Dvoryanin" as early as 1210 in the Novgorod chronicle.

Therefore, I would propose the use of the more common and less specialized term "Dvoryanin" instead of "pomestnik" for lower nobility (AoA & GoA).

The term "deti boyarskie" (literally, Boyar's children) appears as early as 1259 in the Novgorod Chronicle. It seems like that would be a reasonable choice if someone wanted a term for GOA level ranks. Another option would be "lesser boyar" (menshij) or "junior boyar" (molodij), appearing in the 1215 and 1186 entries of the Novgorod chronicle, respectively.